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15 scholarly search engines every student should bookmark

❶Every website that shows up as search result has been hand-picked by research experts. However, the engine pulls from over one billion web pages, encyclopedias, journals and books.

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The Virtual Learning Resources Center VLRC is an online index hosting thousands of scholarly websites, all of which are selected by teachers and librarians from around the globe. The site provides students and teachers with current, valid information for school and university academic projects using an index gathered from research portals, universities and library internet subject guides recommended by teachers and librarians.

Simply ask a question or enter search topics or tools, and iSeek will pull from scholastic sources to find exactly what you are looking for. The search engine is safe, intelligent and timesaving—and it draws from trusted resources from universities, government and established non-commercial sites.

ResearchGate is a unique social networking site for scientists and researchers. Over 11 million researchers submit their work, which totals more than million publications, on the site for anyone to access.

You can search by publication, data and author, or you can even ask the researchers questions. This site is perfect for those studying anything related to healthcare or science.

National Library of Medicine. The database contains more than 3 million full-text journal articles. Lexis Web is your go-to for any law-related inquiries you may have. The results are drawn from legal sites, which can be filtered by criteria such as news, blog, government and commercial. Users can also filter results by jurisdiction, practice area, source and file format. Pulling up an Internet search might be second nature to you by now.

But a little forethought into where you begin your hunt can make your life much easier. Save yourself the time wading through basic Google search results and utilize some of these tools to ensure your results will be up to par with academic standards. Let us know in the comments below!

This article was originally published in December It has since been updated to include information relevant to We value your privacy and will never share your number with any third parties. Google Docs Create documents, presentations, spreadsheets, polls, surveys, or drawings for free and share with others. Organize documents into folders, publish to the web, and collaborate with other users. Special feature is ability to work on a document in real-time with anyone, anywhere. An RSS feed is a source of information that is regularly updated, such as a blog or news site.

By subscribing to RSS feeds, you can get that stream of information delivered to you. Google Reader is a simple and easy way to collect and read RSS feeds. Google Reader enables you to make your own personalized page tailored to your interests. From within Google Reader, you can choose from millions of live Internet content feeds—including articles, blogs, images, and au- dio.

Live Binders4Teachers LiveBinders is an interactive resource for teachers to quickly research websites related to topics they are teaching that otherwise would take them much longer using Google or other search engines. A LiveBinder is a compilation tool made up of several websites related to one specific topic of the LiveBinder. For example, under the category of History LiveBinders, there is one based on the Battle of Guadalcanal.

Within the binder, there are roughly ten websites relating to and describing the battle from different perspectives. Although it is much faster than navigating a topic on a search engine, LiveBinder still retains many of the drawbacks of searching for a topic online. While many websites go through a filter before they are added, the reliance of some of the websites can waver depending on who posts them. As long as this recognition is understood, LiveBinder is a generally good resource for teachers to use in their lesson plans and assignments.

TrackStar TrackStar is a starting point for online lessons and activities for multiple disciplines. Search the database by subject, grade, or theme and standard for a quick and easy activity. Jog the Web Jog the Web is a web-based tool that allows anyone to create a synchronous guide to a series of web sites.

Its a step-by-step approach of taking viewers through web sites allowing the author to annotate and ask guiding questions for each page is unique. Library of Congress An outstanding and invaluable site for American history and general studies. Contains primary and secondary documents, exhibits, map collections, prints and photographs, sound recordings, and motion pictures. The Library of Congress: Teachers The new Library of Congress Teachers page provides tools and resources for using Library of Congress primary source documents in the classroom and include excellent lesson plans, document analysis tools, online and offline activities, timelines, presentations and professional development resources.

The Library of Congress American Memory in particular is an outstanding resource for American history and general studies. Included are multimedia collections of photographs, recorded sound, moving pictures, and digitized text.

Use the Teachers section to explore primary set collections and themed resources. Teachers can get updates on new tools, professional development opportunities, and Library programs, events and services. In addition to its paper holdings which would circle the Earth 57 times it has more than 3.

Users can research people, places, events and other popular topics of interest, as well as ancestry and military records. The Internet History Sourcebooks The Internet History Sourcebooks are wonderful collections of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts for educational use by Paul Halsall. Maintenance of the Sourcebooks is uneven, so expect some broken links.

History of the United Kingdom — Primary Documents These links connect to Western European mainly primary historical documents and shed light on key historical happenings. The sources on the United Kingdom cover various chronological periods, such as to and to Project Gutenberg Project Gutenberg is a major source of free historical electronic texts that can be searched by author or title.

Content is free in the United States because its copyright has expired. Middle East Global Connections: Putting World Events in Context provides the background information needed to understand events occurring in the Middle East.

Designed with educators in mind, the site is also useful for those curious to better understand the Middle East and its relationship with the West. Etext Center Founded in , the Electronic Text Center at the University of Virginia Library offered access to a plethora of primary and secondary source documents and media for teaching and research in the humanities.

Library and Archival Exhibitions on the Web The Smithsonian offers this useful gateway to libraries and exhibits on the Web. Include over links to online exhibitions from libraries, archives, and museums around the world. Documents in Law, History and Diplomacy A great research site from Yale University rich with primary source documents relating to world history.

Searchable database is organized into three periods: Primary Source World Primary Source resources for the Global Classroom features teacher-created, classroom-ready activities designed around key primary sources, including written documents, artifacts, audio clips, visual evidence and much more. Each cluster of sources includes key questions, objectives, and a background essay. Many Pasts The Center for History and New Media produces historical works in new media, tests their effectiveness in the classroom, and reflects critically on the success of new media in historical practice.

Go to the Many Pasts section for primary documents in text, image, and audio about ordinary Americans throughout U. Documenting the American South Documenting the American South DAS is an impressive collection of sources by the University of North Carolina on Southern history, literature and culture from the colonial period through the first decades of the 20th century.

DAS supplies teachers, students, and researchers with a wide range of titles they can use for reference, studying, teaching, and research. Currently, DAS includes ten thematic collections of primary sources for the study of southern history, literature, and culture including Oral Histories of the American South, True and Candid Compositions: Fortunately it has a search feature; there is an amazing amount of material here.

In the First Person First Person is a free, in-depth index of close to 4, collections of personal narratives in English from around the world. It lets you keyword search more than , pages of full-text by more than 18, individuals. It also contains pointers to some 4, audio and video files and 30, bibliographic records. Resources for Teaching American History Several groups of teachers conducted research at the Smithsonian and contributed primary source activities for this website.

These are engaging, quality teaching resources worth exploring. The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Start with the Metropolitan Museum of Art Timeline of Art History, a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of the history of art from around the world. The timelines, accompanied by world, regional, and sub-regional maps, provide a linear outline of art history, and allow visitors to compare and contrast art from around the globe at any time in history.

There is plenty more here apart from the Timeline: The Third Millennium B. Turning the Pages Turning the Pages is an award-winning interactive display system developed by The British Library to increase public access and enjoyment of some of its most valuable treasures.

There are currently fifteen treasures on display in Turning the Pages including: Stories link to organized primary and secondary source materials found principally at U.

The purpose of the site including its separate, stand-alone channels is to take visitors on a virtual guided tour of relevant on-line source materials. Be sure to check out Click2History. This impressive site features reviewed links to top sites, professionally developed lesson plans based on primary sources, classroom activities, materials to help with daily classroom planning, and search engines.

You can search lesson plans by subcategory and grade level; middle school lessons are the most numerous. The resources cover a wide range of historical periods and are arranged in chronological periods.

The lessons are mostly source based case studies centered on key questions. PBS Online A great source for information on a myriad of historical events and personalities.

Many lessons incorporate primary sources. Some lessons require viewing PBS video, but many do not. Social Explorer Reports and interactive maps on census data from to Interactive maps allow you to choose a time period and demographic feature to look at.

You can zoom in on any area or request a corresponding report on the specific information you request. Free maps are mainly of population, race, and religion, but a premium subscription allows access to many more maps. United States Historical Census Data Browser Provides data from census records and other government sources for Users can view extensive population- and economic-oriented statistical information at state and county levels, arranged according to a variety of categories.

Also includes an essay on the history of the census. When asking your librarian or teacher, just be sure to be tactful. Academic journals add credibility and professionalism to a paper. They work well for both humanities and scientific papers. Another great way to access academic papers is Google Scholar.

It is a search tool that finds scholarly articles—academic journals, patents, theses, court proceedings, and more. Google Scholar displays how many times an academic piece of literature was cited, which is a rough numerical indicator of how influential the research was. Google Scholar also has link under each posting to help you find related articles. Some fields such as the humanities prefer their students use books for sources rather than websites, since books typically contain more detailed information and perhaps more in-depth thinking than websites do.

Books can be found on your school or public library website. Type in keywords related to your topic in the search field, and see what kinds of literature comes up. Write down the call number of the book so that you can find it within your library. Google has another service, Google Books, that will help you find books related to your topic. Just type your research topic into the field and Google Books will provide you with a list of relevant books.

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Whether you're looking for the average rainfall in the Amazon rainforest, researching Roman history, or just having fun learning to find information, you'll get some great help using this list of the best .

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Search Engines For Academic Research By TeachThought Staff Last updated Nov 30, 54, Back in , we shared with you awesome search engines and research resources in our post: Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars.

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We’ve saved you the time and picked out our 15 best free search engines for research. 15 scholarly search engines every student should bookmark 1. Google Scholar. Google Scholar was created as a tool to congregate scholarly literature on the web. From one place, students have the ability to hunt for peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles from academic publishers, professional . Just type your research topic into the field and Google Books will provide you with a list of relevant books. Once you click on a book you like, Google Books will give you a preview of the book and information related to buying the book or finding it in your library. Websites – Websites are sources you should approach with caution.

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Providing good resources about the many research departments located at the museum, the website allows students, teachers, and the general public to explore many different aspects of biological, cultural, and evolutionary history. And while it’s no substitute for a good, old-fashioned trip to the library, these sites can help you find reputable articles and journals to aid in your research. Artcyclopedia – If you’re looking for information on artists or art movements, Artcyclopedia is a great place to begin.