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❶Thanks that you agreed to do my physics assignment overnight. It was more than I expected.

These Students Have Answer to "Do My Math Homework" Request

A Game of One-Upmanship
The Problem of Not Doing Homework
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I asked them to contact me if she was struggling in any areas so that I could shift our focus onto those subjects and I asked them if they had any questions for me. They looked at me like I had absolutely lost my mind … which I was fully expecting.

Because what we are doing is not normal and I get that. The first year her teacher was great and completely understanding. The second year, not so much. Thankfully, the meeting went well. Although I went into the meeting thinking I was going to need to defend my alternative lifestyle, I walked out feeling as thought my viewpoints were not only understood, but respected.

Now I love the fact that when Lily messes around in the kitchen making cupcakes, I no longer have to fight the urge to tell her to hurry up — and badger her to finish her homework. Of course, not doing homework is not an option — but these days in our house the aim is to do it as quickly and efficiently as possible. Most of all I love the fact that I can finally appreciate Lily for the person she is now— a year-old girl with an acerbic sense of humor who likes Snoopy, play-dates and kittens — and not for the person I once wanted her to be.

To start with, train your children in good habits and place time limits on how long homework should take from the start. Ask the school how long a child should spend on each subject at night.

Find the time of the day after school that works best for your child — either straight after arriving home or after a short break. Agree a start time every day so that the rule turns into a routine and there is less room for resistance and negotiation.

That will just mask the problem and get you dragged into a nightly conflict. Help them instead to take responsibility for their homework, while you provide guidance from the sidelines on an on-need basis. Her latest book Taming the Tiger Parent: My kids attend a Montessori school which generally does not assign homework. What homework they tend to get in the elementary levels is a packet of assorted reading and math that they have an entire week to do at whatever pace works for them.

But my oldest is in seventh grade and they are trying to transition the kids into what will happen in high school, and my daughter has balked at all the homework. We are always available to help and answer questions, but I explain that I passed whatever grade they are in already, and this is their turn to learn and show what they know.

Because all of us are getting some part of it wrong, regardless. Thanks so much for sharing that perspective, Korinthia. Even among our friends, we are a bit of an extreme case.

Our daughter goes to a private school. When she comes home, we take a short break, and then she sits down for homework while I get dinner ready. Most of the days, it happens without any issues. Some days, she tries to change the rules by wanting to play before homework. I understand her want to do that, but having come from a middle class family in a developing country, my perspective on this is very different. We are where we are, quite literally, due to the discipline we had in regards to education.

That discipline is a very powerful thing and like many things the earlier you get it instilled the easier it is. I see it as my job to instill that discipline in my daughter. What she wants to do with it when she grows up is up to her. D to be a stay-at-home mom now and pursue what I really want to do. In those years, if I can find a way to earn a modest income from this site without selling my soul, great. Anyway, so to me, it boils down to this: I guess for us it comes down to the idea that learning is important, but grades are not.

Maybe because I grew up in a family of artists? We were always busy, always making things and learning something new. I like that they are never bored, and that they LOVE school. They pretend not to be sick when they have a cold just so they can go. Someplace to be excited about. I think the way we grow up, and what we have experienced, colors the lens through which we see the world.

I agree with you that at the end of the day, learning, and the love of learning, are more important than everything else. I think differently about grades though. Grades to me, are a reflection of how well you can apply that learning. You need to be able to apply it in some way — either to earn a living, or help make the world a better place, or whatever.

And, I look at absolute grades… not relative ones. Just like us, she will sometimes be successful in applying that knowledge. Sometimes, not as much. The question then is, what can I do to help her better retain what she has learnt and apply it more effectively?

Thanks for the very considered and calm discussion of this issue that is happening here. This piece is not about Lily so much as it is about how great it can be when we parents discard our baggage and come to our children afresh.

Finding empathy and connection with our children without letting the world which does not always want the best for our kids to get in the way. Please share so that we get other parents have the confidence to do the same — and enjoy their parenting more.. But as far as using grades simply as a barometer of whether a child is taking care of responsibilities that seems completely reasonable.

She feels the magic of a book, for instance, is marred by her picking it apart for an analysis. I used to do the same thing, so I get it. I tell her she just has to pick her consequence. She can either suck it up and do the work, challenge the work by coming up with a different assignment that maybe meets the same criteria the teachers are interested in, or not do it.

The first two improve her report card, and the third hurts it. The report card is a means to more choices about her future. For her, bad grades at a good school are probably worth more than good grades at a bad school, and she will still have more choices than the average child.

And my report cards would have given you a panic attack! I have to agree with you and your daughter about the book reports — we did our first one a few weeks back, and it was decidedly much more unpleasant compared to just reading and enjoying the book! Good luck convincing your daughter to pick one of the first two consequences. One more piece to toss in there if you have time for it: If my kids are learning and working hard, the grades will follow. But their focus should always be on their education, not their grades.

That is particularly true in music where racing from one music grade to the next, as kids do here, can destroy enjoyment of music for its own sake — and that is a very sad. It just becomes about teaching to the test. In my view children should have music as another language — and another outlet for emotion, not just as a way to build CVs. Love that article you pointed to. Some time back, I came across several articles by Alfie Kohn and got very confused about this whole rewards thingie.

So in my opinion, if you use rewards as a way to establish a habit and not as the end result, they still have a place. Grades are a great way to get that habit started initially — they are tangible and there is recognition.

As we go on, we focus the message on the learning — for instance, like me, grammar was not my daughters favorite subject. We never did that in India. Will you teach me how to diagram a sentence? When she draws on her white board and teaches me how to diagram a sentence, there is pride and joy in her and now she is a lot more interested in grammar. I am not a music person I know, sorry: Once the child performs in front of an audience, and enjoys that sense of accomplishment, the practice habit will likely carry through, even if you remove whatever temporary reward you used.

The latest discussion reminded me about the marble jar experiment you shared on your blog some time back here.

At first your kids may have done the chores to earn those marbles to get the screen time or other things rewards. To be honest on music, I think you also know your child is playing the right instrument when they do want to practice. Also music has become a way of life in our house, and they play music together, which helps. Sumitha, I agree about using some rewards for forming habits.

When my kids first started violin we got into a routine of combining practice with dessert. Then just at the end of the practicing.

They were four and six at the time and that helped because it was easier to catch their attention with marshmallows than with some abstract sense of musical improvement, which on violin is painfully slow. It takes the focus off the work and onto the treat, and not getting the treat feels like punishment. In terms of grades, we just view them differently. You know a little something if a kid gets all good grades vs.

I complained to my mom who told me when she was in college absolutely no woman could get an A in her advertising class, and she was far and away the best artist there. Also, some agencies flat out did not hire women, which still blows my mind. Would you rather hire a writer who writes well, or one who writes poorly but always meets deadlines?

Depends on the need. One of my brothers spent his senior year at USC. He was second in his class because he got a B in one of those college courses. A girl who spent all of her high school experience striving for perfect grades. Her brother was the valedictorian of my class, and she felt she had to match that. So she took courses purely based on what she could get an A in. She did not risk taking physics, or calculus. She avoided English and History classes taught by the more challenging teachers.

She wasted her chance at an interesting education so she could say she was valedictorian. For myself as a parent, that would not make me proud at all. Tanith, I agree that kids have to play an instrument that speaks to them. I wish more parents knew that. I had a sample lesson once with a really hostile boy who had a ton of talent and ability, and his mom was making him play.

I asked him what he would rather do, and he wanted to play guitar. I told his mom I thought he should switch or even just add it because violin brought him no joy.

Glad your children like playing violin! One of my projects for the new year is to start building a full size one for my oldest and have her help. Not many kids get to play a violin they literally had a hand in making, so that should be fun! I love this discussion, too Korinthia! Thank you so much for it. With our choice to send her to a private school, these are a part of our everyday life and being more clear about it sure helps!

While I can see your perspective on grades and it makes a ton of sense, it is hard for me to actually be that cool about it, simply because I am where I am because of the grades, degrees etc I had written a guest post a while ago that may provide some background here — on money and happiness. I really like what you have to say. It converges well with what I have said in my book, The Homework Trap: Thanks for sharing that, Dr.

Sounds like an interesting book. I will try to grab a copy of it. I will be definitely checking out your book and sharing it. A survey of students shows that learners want recognition for attempting and completing homework versus just getting the homework correct. Also, students desire praise for their homework effort. Expand homework evaluation to include points for completing the assignment.

In addition, include homework feedback into lesson plans. One example is to identify class time to identify homework patterns with the class student struggles and successes. Another example, is to give students opportunities to compare their homework answers with a peer students can correct or change answers while obtaining feedback. Students want their homework to prepare them for assessments. Allow students to select 1 homework question each unit that they wish to see on the test.

Their homework plan consisted of the time needed to execute the work, meet deadlines, and follow daily completion routines. Amazingly, the students with a plan complete homework in spite of their dislike for the assignment. Help students develop a homework plan. For example, you may show examples and non-examples, offer templates for home-work to-do lists, or challenge students to identify phone Apps that help track homework planning procedures.


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May 01,  · Reasons to do homework include: Learning something that will probably help with future assignments, even if you don't know what they are yet. Proving to your teacher that you understand the homework so that she or 62%().

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Fact #6 Students don’t have a homework plan. It’s unsurprising that making provisions for homework, increases the likelihood that homework is completed. In interviews with ninth graders, 43% of the students that completed all of . Each student thinks with sadness '' I need to do my homework ''. Hide the PC and, if conceivable, the telephone; There ought to be quiet in the room. The best approaches to get roused to take a shot at assignments are straightforward and don't require any exceptional information, arrangements.

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what if i dont do my homework Apr 03, Because I have a big problem with the amount of time-zapping homework my 6-year-old daughter’s school system doles out and because of that, I’ve Live Step-By-Step Homework Help. Jul 30,  · How to Excuse Yourself from Unfinished Homework. Three Methods: Never lie that you did your work because then she will know that you didn't want to do your homework. Don't rely on excuses for your homework all the time. Save them for when you need it, so your teacher is more considerate. Also you could act annoyed 52%().